GRAND SLAM TENNIS ARCHIVE
GRAND SLAM TENNIS STATISTICS


OTHER STATISTICS PAGES

No. 1 DO THE TOP MALE PLAYERS HAVE EASIER MATCHES IN THE FIRST WEEK OF GRAND SLAMS THAN THEY DID IN THE PAST?

No. 2 HOW WELL DO HOME PLAYERS PERFORM IN THEIR GRAND SLAM EVENTS?

No. 3 WHAT WAS THE CHALLENGE ROUND?

No. 4 WHO LOST IN GRAND SLAM FINALS?

No. 5 WHAT ARE THE MEN'S SINGLES GRAND SLAM RECORDS?

No. 7 WHAT ARE QUALIFIERS, LUCKY LOSERS AND WILD CARDS?

No. 8 WHO LOST IN GRAND SLAM SEMI FINALS?

No. 9 WHICH GREAT HAD THE BEST RECORD AGAINST OTHER GREATS?

No. 10 WHAT IS SEEDING?

No. 11 WHO WERE THE MOST AND LEAST DOMINANT CHAMPIONS?

No. 12 WHO WERE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL TENNIS FAMILIES?

No. 13 WHAT IS A DEFAULT?

No. 14 WHAT NATIONALITY ARE GRAND AND PRO SLAM CHAMPIONS?

No. 15 WHAT IS A RETIREMENT?

No. 16 WHO WERE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL CHAMPIONS ON EACH SURFACE?


In the sixth article of the series, the results on this website, displayed as statistics, answer the question:

WHAT IS A TRIPLE BAGEL?

A triple bagel is a match in which the winner(s) wins three complete sets 6-0,6-0,6-0 without losing a game (otherwise known as a "whitewash"). The loser's games score looks like a bagel. According to Bud Collins' Tennis Encyclopedia, the term bagel was first used by Eddie Dibbs in the 1970s. The triple bagel is rare nowadays. This is because even the worst player out of the 128 entrants in the draw is usually good enough to at least hold his serve a couple of times in a match against a top seed. There have been no triple bagels in Grand Slam events since 1993. In the open era there have only been five, three of them occuring in 1987. However, back in the early 20th century triple bagels were commonplace.

When there are over 1000 professional players and only 128 places in a Grand Slam draw, there are a lot of players competing for those places. Back in 1910 the top players were all amateurs and there were nearly as many entrants at Wimbledon and more in the U. S. than there are today. However, there was no qualifying competition and far fewer overseas players, which meant a lot of club hacks filled out the draws in Grand Slams. Therefore the standard of the lowest ranked player in Grand Slam draws in 1910 was (comparitively) far below what it is today. The reason half the triple bagels at the U. S. occured from 1905-1919 was because this was when the size of U. S. draws increased. Before 1915, any member of a U. S. club that owned a racket could enter the U. S. Championships, providing they were prepared to go to Rhode Island to play in it. This is why the draws grew to over 128 entrants. When Forest Hills began hosting the men's singles event in 1915, the rules were changed slightly, so entries had to be submitted through clubs. The entry fee was set high enough to stop players entering and then defaulting their first match in order to get a seat at a lower price (yes, this really did used to happen!) The U. S. had a far greater number of triple bagels than Wimbledon. Although the U. S. had an extra round from 1908-14, only one triple bagel occured in this extra round (in 1910). Before the First World War travelling between Europe and America was rare and only the very best players did it sporadically. There were more top quality players in Europe prepared to travel to Wimbledon than in America that were prepared to travel to the U. S. championships. In the 1920s more foreign players entered the U. S. championships and America produced many top quality players (Tilden was the first American man to win Wimbledon in 1920). As the standard of play at the U. S. increased, the number of triple bagels decreased.

Although the Australian had least triple of bagels of all the Grand Slams, this is not surprising as before 1961 they mostly had draws of 32 compared to 64-128 at the other Grand Slams. In terms of number of matches played in the draw before 1962 (when most of the triple bagels occured), the Australian had a greater percentage of triple bagels than either Wimbledon or the French. All of the Grand Slam triple bagels occured before the quarter finals, except one. This was the 1935 Australian quarter final in which top seed Fred Perry thrashed Giorgio de Stefani (seeded 8) without losing a game. This was probably the most impressive of all the triple bagels. However, Torsten Johansson was the only player to win two matches 6-0,6-0,6-0 in the same tournament. This occured at Wimbledon in 1947. Though Johansson was in good form he was no match for Jack Kramer in the fourth round, losing in straight sets. Since then there has only been one triple bagel at Wimbledon. This was in 1987 when Stefan Edberg won his opening match without losing a game. Though Edberg was famous for his exceptional sportsmanship, this triple bagel proves that he would not let his opponent have a game to avoid the whitewash. Edberg didn't believe in patronising his opponents and if he could win a match without losing a game he would.


TRIPLE BAGELS IN MAJOR EVENTS (TOTAL 71)

U. S. (32)
1890 W. P. Knapp d. F. Kellogg 1st round
1892 H. Slocum d. W. Ryerson 2nd round
1893 M. Wright d. F. Pile 2nd round
1900 A. W. Gore d. H. Clews 2nd round
1902 H. Warner d. W. Wood 1st round
1903 N. Melland d. R. Burlingame 1st round
1905 G. Hinckley d. H. Foster 2nd round
1905 L. Waidner d. B. Thaw 2nd round
1906 W. Putnam d. G. Scott 2nd round
1909 W. Cragin d. I. Thomas 2nd round
1909 R. Gambrill d. G. Keeler 2nd round
1910 M. Chace d. C. Richardson 1st round
1910 T. Bundy d. P. Randolph 2nd round
1910 W. Cragin d. H. MacVicar 2nd round
1911 F. Harris d. A. Bell 2nd round
1911 N. Niles d. H. Chormley 2nd round
1911 G. Wightman d. W. Williams 2nd round
1913 W. Washburn d. W. Kenyon 3rd round
1914 W. Clothier d. R. Little 2nd round
1915 I. Wright d. R. Sommer 1st round
1916 I. Kumagae d. D. Geer 1st round
1919 R. L. Murray d. W. Rosenbaum 1st round
1922 W. Clothier d. H. Lane 1st round
1931 K. Kamrath d. M. Gonzalez 1st round
1934 R. Stanford d. A. de Menezes 2nd round
1936 R. Harman d. W. Robertson 3rd round
1942 F. Parker d. J. Geller 1st round
1952 H. Richardson d. P. Arcocha 2nd round
1954 L. Main d. E. Kilgus 2nd round
1958 G. Golden d. W. Davis 2nd round
1961 M. Olvera d. M. Herceg 1st round
1987 I. Lendl d. B. Moir 1st round

Wimbledon (16)
1878 A. Tabor d. C. Wallis 1st round
1878 A. Brown d. F. Ashley 1st round
1899 H. Roper Barrett d. C. Allen 2nd round
1905 T. Mavrogordato d. H. Gaskell 3rd round
1910 A. Wilding d. R. McNair 4th round
1911 A. W. Gore d. A. Popp 1st round
1913 F. G. Lowe d. H. Bland 1st round
1914 N. Brookes d. L. Davin 2nd round
1923 A. H. Fyzee d. R. Boyd 2nd round
1926 V. Richards d. A. Yencken 1st round
1937 J. Yamagishi d. E. Hanson 1st round
1939 J. Palada d. J. Warboys 1st round
1946 L. Bergelin d. M. Lucking 2nd round
1947 T. Johansson d. B. Royds 1st round
1947 T. Johansson d. P. Geelhand 2nd round
1987 S. Edberg d. S. Eriksson 1st round

French (10)
1925 J. R. Lacoste d. S. Suvarna 1st round
1929 H. Austin d. Espanol 2nd round
1932 A. Merlin d. R. Singh 1st round
1933 R. Rodel d. E. Baer 1st round
1952 A. Lemyze d. A. Sursock 1st round
1952 P. Remy d. O. Rodriguez 1st round
1956 S. Davidson d. E. Powers 1st round
1968 N. Spear d. D. Contet 1st round
1987 K. Novacek d. E. Bengoechea 2nd round
1993 S. Bruguera d. T. Champion 2nd round

Australian (9)
1922 W. Dive d. C. Willard 1st round
1925 J. Anderson d. T. Moon 1st round
1926 J. Anderson d. L. Collins 2nd round
1934 J. Crawford d. H. Betts 1st round
1935 F. Perry d. G. De Stefani QF
1949 J. Bromwich d. L. Schwartz 2nd round
1953 N. Fraser d. G. Harvey 1st round
1960 M. Mulligan d. D. Patterson 1st round
1966 R. Russell d. R. Chopra 1st round

World Hard Court (1)
1923 L. Aslangul d. K. Webb 1st round

Pro Slams from last 16 onwards (3)
1930 K. Kozeluh d. H. McGrath U. S. Pro Last 16
1931 F. Hunter d. J. Burns U. S. Pro Last 16
1935 A. Waasdorp d. A. Bumy French Pro Last 16


This page treats World Hard Court as a Grand Slam.

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