GRAND SLAM TENNIS ARCHIVE
GRAND SLAM TENNIS STATISTICS


OTHER STATISTICS PAGES

No. 1 DO THE TOP MALE PLAYERS HAVE EASIER MATCHES IN THE FIRST WEEK OF GRAND SLAMS THAN THEY DID IN THE PAST?

No. 3 WHAT WAS THE CHALLENGE ROUND?

No. 4 WHO LOST IN GRAND SLAM FINALS?

No. 5 WHAT ARE THE MEN'S SINGLES GRAND SLAM RECORDS?

No. 6 WHAT IS A TRIPLE BAGEL?

No. 7 WHAT ARE QUALIFIERS, LUCKY LOSERS AND WILD CARDS?

No. 8 WHO LOST IN GRAND SLAM SEMI FINALS?

No. 9 WHICH GREAT HAD THE BEST RECORD AGAINST OTHER GREATS?

No. 10 WHAT IS SEEDING?

No. 11 WHO WERE THE MOST AND LEAST DOMINANT CHAMPIONS?

No. 12 WHO WERE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL TENNIS FAMILIES?

No. 13 WHAT IS A DEFAULT?

No. 14 WHAT NATIONALITY ARE GRAND AND PRO SLAM CHAMPIONS?

No. 15 WHAT IS A RETIREMENT?

No. 16 WHO WERE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL CHAMPIONS ON EACH SURFACE?


In the second article of the series, the results on this website, displayed as statistics, answer the question:

HOW WELL DO HOME PLAYERS PERFORM IN THEIR GRAND SLAM EVENTS?

To answer this question, it has been necessary to refer to the original sources that the data on this site was transcribed from. Fortunately the four Grand Slam countries have always been the same size and called the same names throughout the period that these graphs cover. Although some pre-open era sources did not list a few of the lesser known players' nationalities, it was possible in all cases to find the last survivor in the draw from the home nation. In the decade before the First World War players began to travel more to overseas events. The U. S. championships graph begins in 1919, the first post-war championships. Wimbledon's graph begins in 1923, the year after it moved to its' present site at Church Road. Before 1923 Irish players played alongside the British as 'British Isles'. The Irish winners of the 1890s were technically home players, which is why the first foreign winner was Norman Brookes in 1907. The Australian graph begins in 1922. This was the first tournament after New Zealand withdrew from the A. L. T. A., so before that New Zealand competitors were home players. From 1922 onwards New Zealand and Perth were no longer venues. The amount of travelling involved meant a lot of top Australian players didn't play in the event when the Australasian championships were held at New Zealand or Perth. The French graph begins in 1925, when the tournament became open to all amateurs for the first time.

The graphs below show the round reached by the last home survivor in the men's singles.

AUSTRALIAN OPEN
In the days of the Australasian championships, the fields were almost exclusively Australasian. Apart from rare overseas entrants in 1908, 1912, 1915 and 1919 who took the title, the event was dominated by Australasians. Only in 1912 did a home player not reach the final (this year both semi finalists were Australasian). This domination continued after New Zealand's withdrawal from the A. L. T. A., as there were few overseas entries. The only overseas champions from 1922 to 1976 were Jean Borotra in 1928, Colin Gregory in 1929, Fred Perry in 1934, J. Donald Budge in 1938, Dick Savitt in 1951, Alex Olmedo in 1959, Arthur Ashe in 1970 and Jimmy Connors in 1974. In all these cases the runner up was Australian. Then, after Mark Edmondson won the event in 1976, there were no more Australian winners. The many great Aussie champions and finalists from the 1920s to the 1970s are well known. After 1976 the last Australian survivors were John Alexander (a semi finalist in both 1977 events; in January with Ken Rosewall and December with Bob Giltinan), John Marks (1978 finalist), Colin Dibley (semi finalist in 1979), Kim Warwick (finalist in 1980), former champion Mark Edmondson (semi finalist 1981) and Paul McNamee (semi finalist 1982). From 1983 the top overseas men began to regularly enter the event and the best Australian man often failed to reach the quarter finals. The only Aussie quarter finalists from 1983 were Wally Masur (quarter finalist in 1983 & semi finalist in 1987), Pat Cash (quarter finalist in 1984 & finalist in 1987 & 1988), Mark Woodforde (semi finalist in 1996), Pat Rafter (semi finalist in 2001) and Lleyton Hewitt (finalist in 2005). After a very lean period for Australian players, Nick Kyrgios reached the quarters in 2015.
Australian men at the Australian Open


FRENCH OPEN
The French Open opened its' doors to international competitors in 1925 at a time when French tennis was at its' peak. The tournament always attracted a good worldwide entry, but a Frenchman was champion every year from 1925 until 1933, when Henri Cochet was runner up. For the next fifteen years the last home survivor always reached at least the quarters. In 1934 Christian Boussus was a semi finalist. In 1935 Boussus and Marcel Bernard were quarter finalists and the next year they were both semi finalists. In 1937 Boussus and Bernard Destremau were semi finalists and were both quarter finalists the next year. Boussus was a quarter finalist in 1939. Veteran Bernard won the tournament in 1946, was a semi finalist in 1947 and a quarter finalist for the next two years. Robert Abdesselam was also a quarter finalist in 1949. The early fifties were a tough time for French tennis. There were no French quarter finalists from 1950-55. In 1956 Paul Remy lost in the quarters, in 1957 Robert Haillet lost in the quarters and in 1958 Haillet and Pierre Darmon reached the quarters. In 1960 Haillet made the semis, Pilet made the quarters in 1961 and Darmon lost in the quarters in 1962. In 1963 Darmon made it through to the final, the first home finalist since 1946. In 1964 he lost in the semis. In 1965 Pierre Barthes lost in the quarters. In 1966 Francois Jauffret made the semis and the following year Darmon made the quarters. George Goven made the semis in 1970, Patrick Proisy was a quarter finalist in 1971 and a finalist in 1972 (the first since 1963) and Jauffret was a semi finalist in 1974. Then French tennis went through a lean period. In 1981 a certain Yannick Noah reached the quarters. He made the quarters again in 1982 and won the event in 1983 (the first champion since 1946). Noah was a quarter finalist in 1984. Henri Leconte reached the quarters in 1985 and reached the semis in 1986. Noah made his last quarter final in 1987. Leconte reached the final in 1988 and is the last French finalist to date. In 1990 Leconte and Thierry Champion reached the quarters, in 1992 Leconte reached the semis, in 1996 Cedric Pioline made the quarters and two years later reached the semis. In 2001 Sebastien Grosjean was a semi finalist and was a quarter finalist the following year. Julien Benneteau was a quarter finalist in 2006 and Gael Monfils a semi finalist in 2008 and a quarter finalist in 2009, 2011 and 2014. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga reached the quarters in 2012 and semis in 2013 and 2015. Richard Gasquet reached the quarters in 2016. Apart from two lean periods in the early 1950s and late 1970s, the French have produced many quarter finalists. However, only Noah (in 1983) has been a champion since 1946.
French men at the French Open


WIMBLEDON
The British men have been the worst performing of all the Grand Slam nations since the First World War. Before 1910 there was a British Isles winner every year apart from 1907. The graph begins in 1923, when F. Gordon Lowe made the semis. Algy Kingscote made the quarters in 1924. In 1925 Barclay and Fisher made the quarters. In 1926 Charles Kingsley and J. Colin Gregory made the quarters. Bunny Austin first reached the semis in 1929. Gregory made the quarters the following year. Fred Perry reached the semis in 1931. In 1932 Austin reached the final. In 1933 Austin and Pat Hughes lost in the quarters. Then there were Fred Perry's three victories. In 1937 Austin made the semis, in 1938 he made the final and in 1939 the quarters. Tony Mottram was the top British player from 1946-52 but only once made the quarters (1948). The next quarter finalist was Bobby Wilson (in 1958, 1959, 1961 and 1963). In 1961 Mike Sangster went one round better than Wilson and made the semis. Roger Taylor made the semis in 1967, 1970 and 1973. Then followed more than twenty years without a British male quarterfinalist. The likes of Mark Cox, Buster Mottram and John Lloyd were the top British players from 1974-86. Mottram and Cox were seeded and Lloyd was a finalist at the Australian Open but none of them got beyond the fourth round at their home Grand Slam. Then Jeremy Bates was the top British man in the late 1980s and early 1990s. He never got beyond the fourth round. Then Mr. Timothy Henman arrived. He was the last British survivor every year from 1996-2004, reaching the quarters in 1996, 1997, 2003 and 2004 and the semis in 1998, 1999, 2001 and 2002. Greg Rusedski reached the quarters with Henman in 1997. Then Andy Murray arrived and reached the quarters in 2008 and the semis in 2009, 2010 & 2011. Murray became the first British male finalist since 1938 when he reached the final in 2012. Murray became the first British winner for 77 years when he won in 2013. This was the longest title gap for a home player at a Grand Slam singles event.
British men at Wimbledon



U. S. OPEN
Americans have been the best performing of all the Grand Slam host nations. There was at least one American man in the quarter finals every year from 1881 until 2008. Before 1926, the only year that an American man didn't win the event was 1903, when Bill Larned lost in the Challenge Round. In 1926 Vinnie Richards reached the semis. From 1927-55 the only time an American didn't reach the final was in 1933, when Frank Shields and Les Stoefen reached the semis. Then the Americans struggled as the Australians dominated. In 1956 Vic Seixas was the last home player when he lost in the semis. In 1957 Herb Flam lost in the semis. In 1958 all the beaten quarter finalists were Americans (Seixas, Olmedo, Savitt and Flam). In 1959 Alex Olmedo reached the final. In 1960 Butch Buchholz and Dennis Ralston were semi finalists. In 1961 all the beaten quarter finalists (Dell, Douglas, Reed and Holmberg) were Americans. In 1962 Chuck McKinley reached the semis. In 1963 Frank Froehling lost in the final. In 1964 McKinley reached the semis. Arthur Ashe reached the semis in 1965. Clark Graebner reached the quarters in 1966 and the final the following year. Then Ashe became the first American winner since 1955 when he won the first U. S. championships of the open era in 1968. In 1969 Ashe lost in the semis and in 1970 Cliff Richey lost in the semis. In 1971 Smith won and in 1972 Ashe lost in the final. In 1973 Smith lost in the semis. From 1974-85 there was an American winner or finalist every year. In 1986 Tim Wilkison was the last American, reaching the quarters. In 1987 veteran Connors made the semis. In 1988 teenager Agassi made the semis. In 1989 Agassi and Aaron Krickstein made the semis. From 1990-96 Americans reached the final or better every year. In 1997 Michael Chang made the semis. In 1998 Pete Sampras lost in the semis. There was an American finalist every year from 1999-2003. However, since then there has been no American Grand Slam champion. The last American survivors in the men's singles from 2004-08 were three men. Andy Roddick reached the quarters in 2004, the final in 2006 and the quarters in 2007 and 2008. Agassi reached the quarters with Roddick in 2004 and the final in 2005 and Mardy Fish reached the quarters with Roddick in 2008. 2009 was the first year ever that there was no American man in the quarters of the men's singles. This happened again in 2010. In 2011 Andy Roddick and John Isner lost in the quarters. In 2017 Samuel Querrey lost in the quarters.
American men at the U. S. Open

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AUSTRALIAN OPEN ARCHIVE

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