GRAND SLAM TENNIS ARCHIVE
GRAND SLAM TENNIS STATISTICS


OTHER STATISTICS PAGES

No. 1 DO THE TOP MALE PLAYERS HAVE EASIER MATCHES IN THE FIRST WEEK OF GRAND SLAMS THAN THEY DID IN THE PAST?

No. 2 HOW WELL DO HOME PLAYERS PERFORM IN THEIR GRAND SLAM EVENTS?

No. 3 WHAT WAS THE CHALLENGE ROUND?

No. 4 WHO LOST IN GRAND SLAM FINALS?

No. 5 WHAT ARE THE MEN'S SINGLES GRAND SLAM RECORDS?

No. 6 WHAT IS A TRIPLE BAGEL?

No. 7 WHAT ARE QUALIFIERS, LUCKY LOSERS AND WILD CARDS?

No. 8 WHO LOST IN GRAND SLAM SEMI FINALS?

No. 9 WHICH GREAT HAD THE BEST RECORD AGAINST OTHER GREATS?

No. 10 WHAT IS SEEDING?

No. 11 WHO WERE THE MOST AND LEAST DOMINANT CHAMPIONS?

No. 12 WHO WERE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL TENNIS FAMILIES?

No. 13 WHAT IS A DEFAULT?

No. 14 WHAT NATIONALITY ARE GRAND AND PRO SLAM CHAMPIONS?

No. 15 WHAT IS A RETIREMENT?

No. 16 WHO WERE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL CHAMPIONS ON EACH SURFACE?

No. 18 WHO WON GRAND SLAM TITLES CONTAINING THE MOST TOP PLAYERS (WOMEN)?


In the seventeenth article of the series, the results on this website, displayed as statistics, answer the question:

WHO WON GRAND SLAM TITLES CONTAINING THE MOST TOP PLAYERS (MEN)?

A question often pondered among tennis fans is who won Grand Slams against the strongest opposition? It can be determined which Grand Slams contained the most top players. By using the top 8 world rankings (before 1973 these were the end of year rankings published in the Bud Collins Encyclopedia and from 1973 onwards these were the end of year ATP rankings) we can analyse each Grand Slam in turn and see how many top players played in it. The rankings began at the end of 1919 (so every Grand Slam men's singles event from 1920 onwards is analysed using the rankings at the end of the previous year). If the number one ranked player entered the event, the event is credited with 16 points, if the number 2 player is present 15 points, number 3 credited with 14 points, number 4 credited with 13 points, number 5 credited with 12 points, number 6 credited with 11 points, number 7 credited with 10 points and number 8 credited with 9 points. This means each Grand Slam has a potential total of 100 points. Before 1968, if players listed in the rankings turned pro at the end of the year listed, they are removed from the list and the players ranked 9 and/or 10 are listed. At the end of 1958 three of the top 10 turned pro, so there are 7 listed players and the final totals are multiplied by 1.099 to account for the missing player. During World War 2 there were no world rankings, so the USTA rankings are used and divided by 2 for US Championships. For the French, Wimbledon and US championships in 1968, there was a combined pro/amateur ranking, using the top 4 ranked pros and top 4 ranked amateurs at the end of 1967, with the pros listed first.

The Australian Championships of the 1920s and 1930s sometimes registered zero points, with none of the top 8 players in the world present on several occasions. Before 1970, the Australian finished last of the four Grand Slams in every year except 1922 (when the World Hard Court championships finished below it), 1937 (when the French finished below it), 1938 (when all the other three Grand Slams finished below it), 1939 (when the French finished below it), 1955 (when the French and US finished below it during a period when Australian amateur tennis was at its peak), 1958 (when the French finished below it) and 1967 (when the US finished below it). In most years of the pre-open era the Australian scored below 50 out of 100 points. In 1970 and 1971 contract pros didn't play in the French, which meant it finished well behind the Australian. The Wimbledon 1973 boycott meant Wimbledon finished below the Australian that year. Jan Kodes, despite winning three Grand Slam titles, accumulated just 54 points (out of a potential 300) because of winning the French in 1970 and 1971 without the contract pros present and Wimbledon 1973 in the boycott year. The French Open of 1975 finished below the 1975 Australian due to a poor entry that year, but in subsequent years, the number of top players entering the Australian was so low that Johan Kriek registered 0 points for winning the event in 1982, when none of the top 10 entered the event. In 1983 and 1984 (Wilander's first two Australian Open victories), the Australian was worth 43 and 37 points, but in 1985 (Edberg's first Grand Slam title) it had risen to 68 points. By 1992 the winner of the Australian picked up 89 points and in 2000 the event first registered 100 points (this was the first year all four Grand Slams registered 100 points, meaning all of the top 8 at the end of the previous year played in all four Slams).

The French's points totals before 1970 were sometimes mediocre rather than really bad like the Australian. In 1929 and 1935 it registered 80 points, but registered under 50 several times before the war. The last three championships before World War 2 were particularly bad, registering 22, 25 and 14 points as the event reached its lowest point. Under 50 values were the norm in the late 1940s. In the 1950s and 1960s, the French registered 48 or over values in every year, sometimes well over (even registering 100 in 1954). After contract pros boycotted the event in 1970 and 1971 and WCT players were banned in 1972, the event struggled to regain momentum, registering 38 and 26 points in 1974 and 1975. By 1976 and 1977 this had risen to 54 and 56 and by 1978 it was at 71.

Wimbledon was often the best Grand Slam when it came to number of top players competing. However, that wasn't the case until 1928. In 1922, when the event moved to Church Road, it registered 42 points, whereas the US had 90 points that year. The 1926 championships registered 25 points, whereas the following year it was 77 points. Wimbledon was the best Grand Slam from 1928 to 1937. However, there were two mediocre years before the war, registering 52 points in 1938 (behind the Australian) and 41 points in 1939 (behind the US). After the war, Wimbledon continued to lead the way, attracting most of the top players until the end of the 1960s. A WCT ban in 1972 meant it registered just 37 points and the boycott the next year meant it was worth just 14 points. However, in 1974 it was back up to its typical standards again, registering 91 points. 1982 was a bad year though, when the event registered just 40 points. In 2001 the event was worth 62 points and in 2002 the event was worth 55 points, but from 2006 onwards the event was at its peak, often registering 100 points.

The US championships was the top event in the mid 1920s, but from 1928 was behind Wimbledon, though often not far behind. 1936 was a poor year, the event registered 27 points (only the Australian was worse). After the war the US nearly always had a value above 50 points, though in 1961 it was just 28 points, 1963 41 points and 1967 38 points (in 1967 it was in last place of the four Grand Slams). In the open era, the event was very strong, often registering values in the high 80s and 100 on many occasions. However, in 2017, the event was harmed by many of the top players being injured and was worth just 30 points. This was the lowest value of any French, Wimbledon and US championships since the French in 1975 and the lowest at any slam since the Australian in 1982. Fortunately this was a rare blip in modern times, when participation by the top players at the Grand Slams is very high.

With each player getting points for each Grand Slam won, it is interesting to notice some key differences this table has to the list of Grand Slam men's singles titles won. Rafa Nadal (largely down to a poor field at the 2017 US Open) is only four points ahead of Novak Djokovic, despite winning two Grand Slams (worth a potential 200 points) more than him. Djokovic is only 321 points behind Federer, despite being four Grand Slams behind him, meaning of the "big 3", Djokovic has won the Grand Slams containing the most top players. Rod Laver's Grand Slam wins were against strong fields. So were Andre Agassi's. Roy Emerson's Grand Slams were against poor fields (few of the top amateurs of the era entered the Australian events he won) and he is lower in the table than Lendl, Tilden, Agassi, Borg and Laver, despite winning more Grand Slams than any of them. Emerson averaged just over 53 points per slam, whereas Federer and Agassi were around 92 and Djokovic 95 (Nadal and Sampras averaged around 85). Only one of Don Budge's 6 Grand Slam titles registered above 55 points, which means he is lower in the table than players who have won less Grand Slam titles than him. Jack Crawford, a six time Grand Slam singles champion, is below two time Grand Slam winners such as Patrick Rafter, Sergi Bruguera and Marat Safin. This is because of the poor quality fields of his Australian championships (two of Crawford's four Australian titles registered 0 values). Jan Kodes is listed among the winners of one major title, as are Adrian Quist and James Anderson.

1. Roger Federer 74 90 78 88 79 87 75 91 100 100 100 100 100 100 84 100 100 100 100 100 = 1846

2. Rafael Nadal 86 81 100 80 100 88 77 88 88 91 91 76 91 88 100 30 85 89 = 1529

3. Novak Djokovic 100 100 100 88 100 87 88 100 100 100 100 86 100 100 88 88 = 1525

4. Pete Sampras 100 100 100 67 100 78 91 67 67 79 91 71 100 90 = 1201

5. Rod Laver 40 100 41 88 91 52 91 54 90 100 100 = 847

6. Bjorn Borg 38 26 77 87 71 79 87 89 78 70 87 = 789

7. Andre Agassi 100 100 78 100 75 100 91 91 = 735

8. Bill Tilden 88 38 37 42 41 90 44 86 91 60 73 = 690

9. Ivan Lendl 100 88 72 100 100 87 65 67 = 679

10. Roy Emerson 28 28 37 52 26 100 91 31 77 49 54 72 = 645

11. Jimmy Connors 29 91 91 89 100 40 87 100 = 627

12. John McEnroe 100 90 77 100 90 68 68 = 593

13. Ken Rosewall 43.1 68.8 75 52.2 69 100 69 30 = 507.1

14. Fred Perry 51 31 86 47 80 91 90 27 = 503

15. Stefan Edberg 68 67 91 81 90 91 = 488

16. J. Rene Lacoste 23 37 90 66 100 88 80 = 484

17. Boris Becker 88 75 75 80 54 100 = 472

18. Mats Wilander 61 43 37 100 64 76 90 = 471

19. John Newcombe 88 38 89 100 26 90 31 = 462

20. Henri Cochet 38 77 54 57 85 43 40 = 394

21. Tony Trabert 66 100 48 100 64 = 378

22. Jim Courier 75 89 86 87 = 337

23. J. Donald Budge 75 50 55 25 52 39 = 296

24. Lew Hoad 45.8 53.2 91.7 90 = 280.7

25. Gustavo Kuerten 80 100 100 = 280

26. Frank Sedgman 13 48 76 77 63 = 277

27. Andy Murray 85 100 88 = 273

28. Manuel Santana 52 64 64 89 = 269

29. Stan Wawrinka 100 91 75 = 266

30. Ashley Cooper 39 54 77 75 = 245

31. H. Ellsworth Vines 59 91 90 = 240

32. Jaroslav Drobny 53 67 100 = 220

33. Arthur Ashe 81 60 72 = 213

34. Neale Fraser 46.1 90 64 = 200.1

35. Sergi Bruguera 100 100 = 200

35. Marat Safin 100 100 = 200

37. Patrick Rafter 89 100 = 189

38. Guillermo Vilas 56 100 14 11 = 181

39. Jack Crawford 29 36 73 41 = 179

40. Jack Kramer 40.5 64 60 = 164.5

41. Ilie Nastase 100 62 = 162

42. Yevgeny Kafelnikov 87 69 = 156

43. Frank Parker 37.5 34 39 41 = 151.5

44. Budge Patty 65 84 = 149

45. Bobby Riggs 41 63 39 = 143

46. Nicola Pietrangeli 61.5 81 = 142.5

47. Lleyton Hewitt 87 55 = 142

48. Pancho Gonzales 60 81 = 141

49. Fred Stolle 50 89 = 139

50. Alex Olmedo 42.8 84.6 = 127.4

51. Vic Seixas 68.8 57 = 125.8

52. Ted Schroeder 25.5 100 = 125.5

53. Jean Borotra 45 25 13 35 = 118

54. Dick Savitt 38 79 = 117

55. Gottfried von Cramm 66 42 = 108

56. Merv Rose 56 48 = 104

57. Pat Cash 100

57. Juan Martin del Potro 100

57. Gaston Gaudio 100

57. Carlos Moya 100

57. Thom Muster 100

62. Stan Smith 58 37 = 95

63. Albert Costa 90

63. Yannick Noah 90

65. Michael Chang 89

66. Petr Korda 88

67. Juan-Carlos Ferrero 86

67. Richard Krajicek 86

67. Chuck McKinley 86

67. Andy Roddick 86

71. Bob Falkenburg 84

72. Michael Stich 79

73. Manuel Orantes 76

74. Tony Roche 74

75. Marin Cilic 72

76. Mal Anderson 69

76. John Doeg 69

78. Adrian Quist 24 29 14 = 67

79. Thomas Johansson 64

79. Sidney Wood 64

81. Goran Ivanisevic 62

82. Don McNeill 14 47 = 61

82. Sven Davidson 61

84. James Anderson 23 14 23 = 60

84. Andres Gomez 60

86. Wilmer Allison 58

87. Adriano Panatta 54

87. Bill Johnston 26 28 = 54

87. Jan Kodes 9 31 14 = 54

90. Arthur Larsen 51

91. Gerald Patterson 42

92. Rafael Osuna 41

92. Ken McGregor 41

94. Andres Gimeno 37

95. Josef Asboth 35

96. Brian Teacher 32

97. Dinny Pails 30

98. John Bromwich 27

99. Vivian McGrath 26

100. Joe Hunt 25

101. William Laurentz 23

102. Henner Henkel 22

103. Yvon Petra 14

103. Marcel Bernard 14

105. Vitas Gerulaitis 13

106. Mark Edmondson 11

106. Johan Kriek 11

106. Roscoe Tanner 11

109. Jack Hawkes 10

109. Pat O'Hara Wood 10

109. J. Colin Gregory 10

This page treats World Hard Court as a Grand Slam. Rankings for 1982-1985 are taken in late November, due to the Australian being played in November-December in those years (the Australian was held in December-January or January in all other years since 1972).


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