GRAND SLAM TENNIS ARCHIVE
GRAND SLAM TENNIS STATISTICS


OTHER STATISTICS PAGES

No. 1 DO THE TOP MALE PLAYERS HAVE EASIER MATCHES IN THE FIRST WEEK OF GRAND SLAMS THAN THEY DID IN THE PAST?

No. 2 HOW WELL DO HOME PLAYERS PERFORM IN THEIR GRAND SLAM EVENTS?

No. 3 WHAT WAS THE CHALLENGE ROUND?

No. 4 WHO LOST IN GRAND SLAM FINALS?

No. 5 WHAT ARE THE MEN'S SINGLES GRAND SLAM RECORDS?

No. 6 WHAT IS A TRIPLE BAGEL?

No. 7 WHAT ARE QUALIFIERS, LUCKY LOSERS AND WILD CARDS?

No. 8 WHO LOST IN GRAND SLAM SEMI FINALS?

No. 9 WHICH GREAT HAD THE BEST RECORD AGAINST OTHER GREATS?

No. 10 WHAT IS SEEDING?

No. 11 WHO WERE THE MOST AND LEAST DOMINANT CHAMPIONS?

No. 12 WHO WERE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL TENNIS FAMILIES?

No. 13 WHAT IS A DEFAULT?

No. 15 WHAT IS A RETIREMENT?

No. 16 WHO WERE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL CHAMPIONS ON EACH SURFACE?


In the forteenth article of the series, the results on this website, displayed as statistics, answer the question:

WHAT NATIONALITY ARE GRAND AND PRO SLAM CHAMPIONS?

Before the First World War men's tennis was dominated by five countries: U. S. A., Great Britain, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand. One German victory at the World Hard Court in 1912 was the only time a player not from these nations won a Grand Slam title in this period. The last Irish winner was in 1912 and the last New Zealand winner in 1914. In the 1920s and 1930s France joined Great Britain, U. S. A. and Australia as the dominant forces in the game, with the occasional German winner as well. Great Britain won their last Grand Slam title for 76 years in 1936 and France (apart from one title in 1983) had their last winner in 1946. After the war a few more nations produced Grand Slam champions, but U. S. A. and Australia dominated. This continued until the early 1970s. Then Australia's dominance ended and Sweden emerged as a dominant force from the mid 1970s through to the early 1990s. At the end of the 1970s tennis began to produce champions from countries that hadn't previously been successful (ie Argentina). America's dominance ended in 1984 as Sweden, Czechoslovakia and Germany dominated. Then America dominated the 1990s. By 2004 America's run of success had dried up and Switzerland began to dominate with Spain. Serbia and Spain then dominated. In total Australia have won 100 Grand Slam men's singles titles, but America are two short of 150.

In the pro game, America dominated the 1930s with Germany (in the form of Hans Nusslein) and Czechoslovakia (in the form of Karel Kozeluh) the other main rivals. Perry and Cochet were unable to continue their amateur success and won just three pro slam titles between them (two of them when they were the only former Grand Slam champion in the field). Then America dominated the period from 1942-56, winning every pro slam held apart from one sole Australian victory. From 1957-59 America and Australia rivalled each other. From 1960 Australia dominated, winning every pro slam from 1963-67.

In the women's game, America have more Grand Slam champions than in the men's. Before the Second World War the Australian championships was dominated by home players. There were a scattering of American champions after the war but the Australians dominated until 1978, since when there has been no Australian champion (similar to the men's). The World Hard Court and French was dominated by France until the late 1920s. Then a number of nations won. After the War the Americans dominated with a few British and Australian wins. This continued right up until the mid 1970s. At Wimbledon the British dominated before the First World War. Then there was French dominance. Then America dominated from the late 1920s right up until 1958. Then Brazil, Australia and America dominated until 1971, from which point America dominated alone. America dominated at their own championships right up until 1959, when Brazil and Australia joined them. America dominated alone from 1971. At all the Grand Slams from 1979-1987 America dominated and there was also the occasional Czech victory. Then Germany, Yugoslavia (Serbia), Switzerland and Spain dominated the remainder of the century. America dominated in the early part of the 21st century, with other European nations (particularly Russia and Belgium) scoring wins. America have won 205 women's singles titles, with Australia second on 62. Great Britain are still in third place in both the men's and women's.

The pie charts below show the nationality of Grand Slam men's singles, Pro Slam men's singles and Grand Slam women's singles champions. The pro slams chart does not contain the data of pro champions. The first 28 years of pro champions (82%) were all American and the last 6 years (18%) were all Australian. In the Grand Slam men's singles champions the 24 "others" are Austria 1, Brazil 3, Croatia 2, Ecuador 1, Egypt 3, Holland 1, Hungary 1, Italy 3, Mexico 1, Romania 2, Russia 4 & South Africa 2 (each is less than 1% of the total). The 19 "others" in the Grand Slam women's singles champions are Argentina 1, Belarus 2, Chile 1, China 2, Croatia 1, Denmark 3, Holland 1, Hungary 1, Ireland 3, Italy 2, Romania 1 & Slovenia (Yugoslavia) 1 (each is less than 1% of the total). Monica Seles (Yugoslavia) was Serbian born. On the graph her first 8 titles count as Serbia. She won her last Grand Slam title as an American.

Nationality of Grand Slam men's singles championsNationality of Pro Slam men's singles champions
Nationality of Grand Slam women's singles champions


This page treats World Hard Court as a Grand Slam.

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