Spencer Gore

SPENCER GORE (GREAT BRITAIN)

Born: 10/3/1850 Died: 19/4/1906

Wimbledon 1877

Spencer Gore is immortalised in history as the first winner of a Grand Slam title. Gore, an old Harrovian, was born and bred in Wimbledon and was a good all round sportsman. He played the game of rackets, real tennis and played cricket to a good standard as well. Tennis was always inferior to cricket in Gore's mind. He is famous for saying "That anyone who has really played well at cricket, tennis, or even rackets, will ever seriously give his attention to lawn tennis, beyond showing himself to be a promising player, is extremely doubtful; for in all probability the monotony of the game would choke him off before he had time to excel in it." In the inaugural Wimbledon championships in 1877 Gore came through a field of 22 entrants and some time after half past four on Thursday 19th July 1877 he beat William Marshall in the final to become the first ever Wimbledon champion. The following year Gore stood out until the Challenge Round, where he met Frank Hadow. Hadow used the lob successfully, beating Gore at the net and Gore surrendered his title in straight sets. That was the last time Gore played tournament tennis. He died in 1906 at the age of 56.

GRAND SLAM TENNIS ARCHIVE

HEAD TO HEAD Win-Loss: F.Hadow 0-1

GRAND SLAM RECORD
1877 Wimbledon 8 1878 Wimbledon 7.5


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